Sunday, April 22nd, 2012...6:21 pm

27. Reflection on the Uprooting of Mexicans and Indians

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Gloria Anzaldúa comments on the effects of the Treaty of Guadalupe – Hidalgo on Mexicans:

“The Gringo, locked into the fiction of white superiority, seized complete political power, stripping Indians and Mexicans of their land while their feet were still rooted in it. Con el destierro y el exilio fuimos desunados, destroncados, destripados – we were jerked out by the roots, truncated, disemboweled, dispossessed, and separated from our identity and our history” (Anzaldúa 1497)

Anzaldúa reflects on the history of the United States and the Mexicans role in this history.  The Treaty of Guadalupe – Hidalgo annexed land into the United States that Mexicans resided on, literally “stripping Indians and Mexicans of their land while their feet were still rooted in it.” Anzaldúa emphasizes the notion that the Mexicans and the Indians had laid there roots on this land before the Europeans. Anzaldúa uses the land as a metaphor: “we were jerked out by the roots, truncated, disemboweled, dispossessed, and separated from our identity and our history.” The words, “truncated truncated, disemboweled, dispossessed, and separated” imply a sense that the “Gringos” dehumanized the Indians and the Mexicans. Anzaldúa claims that this uproot not only separated them from their land, but also from their identity and their history (by forcing assimilation and American citizenship on these people and taking away what was theirs).  I also find it interesting that Anzaldúa refers to “white superiority” as “fiction,” implying that there is really no such thing as white superiority. She highlights that in reality, white’s are not a superior race, but this superiority is a social construct.

 

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